I will thank the Lord with all my heart as I meet with his godly people. How amazing are the deeds of the Lord! All who delight in him should ponder them. Psalm 111:1-2 NLT

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Plan, Plant, and Reap Harvest

Delores Topliff

All seeds planted grow because they contain life. The only reason they won’t grow is if they’re kept sealed in unopened packages and not planted. I like this song:


God is a farmer, He planted a garden, the invisible things of Him are thereby clearly seen,
For the whole creation is a revelation of the spiritual principles of Father God,
And the most important principle of all is what you sow you reap.

Whatsoever you sow, that shall you also reap, there is no greater truth, there is no other way.

For the whole creation is a revelation of the spiritual principles of Father God,
And the most important principle of all is what you sow you reap.

We think farmers’ labors begin in spring when they hop on tractors to plow and plant fields. During summer they cultivate and irrigate. In fall comes harvest, and afterward, fields are disked with stubble plowed under to enrich soil for the next season.

My friend launched space satellites for GE but then moved to Canada to help us establish a remote Christian farm. In the process he shepherded 102 Romney sheep which my younger son eventually took over. I didn’t initially regard this man as handsome. But as time went by and I saw his faithful consistent kindness to animals and people, he became the most handsome man I’d ever known.

He taught our high school boys agriculture; most impressive was his farming calendar. He explained that farmers work all twelve months but their most important season is winter planning. The entire rest of the year depends on plans made then. Instead of jetting to Hawaii, which most farmers can’t afford anyway, this is their critical time to build or repair equipment, plan fields, select and/or prepare seeds (cut potatoes into eyes), help spring livestock birth, and be off and running. If thorough winter planning isn’t done, the rest of the year suffers.

For writers, too, our most critical part time is our pre-writing planning. Don’t be like people I’ve heard of who “sow wild oats but pray for crop failure.” Instead, select and pay the price for your writing seed idea packet. When the weather’s right, open it and plant using hard work and faith to do your best. After you’ve done your part, ask God to bless and bring rich harvest.

What’s the most important season of your writing calendar? Which part’s your favorite?

6 comments:

  1. I have two favorite times: the planning where everything is new and exciting and I'm discovering who the characters are and what's going to happen to them. Then after the 1st draft is written, I like the rewriting process. In fact, all during the first draft I keep telling myself, you can't edit what you haven't written. lol
    Great post, DEE!

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  2. I appreciate your great response, & for you posting on FB. Thanks, friend.

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  3. Hi Dee!

    I spend a lot of time pre-writing. I love all the aspects of it -- with the exception of the final edits. By that time, I've looked at it so many times I begin to wonder if I'm really making it better!

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  4. Dee, I love your farming analogies. I always find such truth in your words.

    I'm a plotter, so I need the prewriting to help me know where I'm going with the novel. Otherwise, I'm like a farmer with no direction and have sporadic plants instead of a field of harvestable crops. I will say the rough draft is the hardest part for me. I love the editing phase when the story is down, but I can go back and polish to make those rough words shine.

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  5. I'm more of a "panster"(writing by the seat of your pants)but I have learned in the last several months how crucial to be a plotter as well. If I give in to my panster side, I write far more than I use and that is wasted time. If I plot a good skeleton then my story writes faster and far better than panstering alone. Sure I still write by the seat of my pants, but not without a firm foundation ;)

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  6. Thanks for comments, friends--I appreciate each of you. Glad you're not exhausted w/ my farm analogies yet. In church Sun. I was so encouraged that the Lord affirmed/confirmed the redemptive theme of my first 2 novels (and me writing novels) more than I've experienced before--very encouraged & grateful for that. Sending that encouragement and love to each of you!

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