I will thank the Lord with all my heart as I meet with his godly people. How amazing are the deeds of the Lord! All who delight in him should ponder them. Psalm 111:1-2 NLT

Monday, May 23, 2011

Kiss UR E-mail





If I receive another e-mail with an address from gods-princess@anyserver.com or from our-names-morphed-into-an-email-address@not-original.com or from somestrangename@wheredidyougetthat.com, I'm going to ... hmmm, nothing original comes to mind. But trust me, I'm not going to be happy.

Okay, I know some of you may not like this blog post. I’ll admit I'm ranting a bit. I know many of you are fond of your creativity. Or you may find change difficult. Just stay with me for the rest of this post.


Imagine the editors and agents who receive tons of e-mails from prospective clients. They also have to wade through spam mail. Now take a peek in your spam folder. See any similarities to your e-mail address?

Way back in the fourth grade we learned how to write a return address on an envelope's upper left hand corner. Doing so meant the receiver knew who the letter was from. Now think about your e-mail address in that corner instead. Would you want to open the letter if you'd never met luvs2golf@anyserver.com?

Your e-mail address is your calling card--your nom de plume, if you will. Agents and editors look at it. Someone once said, “You only get one chance to make a good first impression,”--and that includes your e-mail address. What kind of impression does gluvsdogs@ make? So, someone whose name begins with "G" loves dogs.Or maybe someone likes to put gloves on their dog. So what? E-mail addresses like this scream unprofessional!

Can I tell you another secret? Your friends don’t like your fun, funky e-mail address much, either. Every time they want to send you an e-mail, they have to wrack their brains to remember whose e-mail address is whose. Something simple like bettysmith@pickadomain.com lets Betty’s friends know who’s emailing them. It also lets the agent she just queried know that Betty's not a spammer and that she takes her career seriously.

 When it comes to your e-mail address, just KISS it. Just Keep It Simple Sista.

So tell me, what do your friends' e-mail addresses say to you? What does your e-mail address say to others?


~ Ginger Takamiya
clipart by phillipmartin.com

10 comments:

  1. Ginga, you did it again. This is useful and important. I'll have to rethink mine, and do see many that come in as you've described. Thanks and have a GREAT day/week!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I gave my email address some thought before picking it. I wanted it to represent me, just as you described in your post. I hope it does what I need it to do.
    teaching by writing at yahoo dot com

    ReplyDelete
  3. I tried a fun, funky email once.
    Um, didn't work too well. It's now my gmail email, which has become more of a filing cabinet. I've settled on plain, old beth@bethvogt.com. Simple and to the point.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I am so with you Ginger. And I love your KISS definition, Sista. We always need to keep in mind that we are professionals. That is, if we want to be taken seriously. Good post!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Whaaat? You mean dietcokewithlimeaddict@whatever.com is a bad address? Hehe...just kidding...even though the aforementioned would be totally fitting, I'm like Beth...plain old melissatagg@yahoo.com. Though people keep telling me to drop Yahoo and switch to Gmail. Such. A. Hassle. So it hasn't happened yet...

    Anyhow, fun, practical post, Ginger! Thanks for ranting, uh, sharing! :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hmmm, Ginger, hadn't thought about this before! Yes, we tried to be creative MANY years ago, and we haven't switched up our e-mail address much since then. As I enter a more professional stage in my life, I guess I'm going to have to re-think or set up a personal address, just for professional correspondence. Thanks for the insight! :)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Right on! It drives me crazy trying to remember someone's handle. I have to search gmail to try to figure out CBRadio@handle.com's email address.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Good thoughts, Ging. I've got an amy@amylindberg.com or something, but I don't use it too much yet. I need to get rid of my University one first!

    ReplyDelete
  9. I have two email addresses. One I've had for close to a decade and has a creative name I use, in varying forms, as a screen name for many different websites. The other I just recently created for the very reasons you outline in your awesome post, Ginger. I use my name, clear and simple, and I am at yahoo.com until I figure out how to have a @heidilarsongeis.com. Most of my friends and family have had the other one so long, it would almost be more difficult to change with them, but I certainly didn't want to use my silly nickname on my resume or when corresponding with publishers, editors, and/or potential copy clients. I hadn't even thought about being confused with spam! Thanks for the great info!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I'm a day late in replying.

    I have two emails--one for private use and one for professional use. My private use email--ojidli was created more then ten years ago when I tried to set up my email with yahoo. Everything I tried was taken, so ojidli is a combination of my name. Before I started my lisajordanbooks email, people remembered me by my "unique" email. lisajordanbooks is used for writing-related emails and it's much easier for readers and industry professionals to remember.

    ReplyDelete